Using Visual Aids to Teach Autistic Children About Team Sports


All children benefit from a healthy amount of physical activity, gaining concrete physical benefits like agility, improvement in muscle strength, coordination and flexibility, as well as life expectancy. For children with ASD, additional benefits can include an improvement in their quality of life and a measurable boost to their self-esteem.

According to George Frey, an associate profession at Indiana University, kids with autism need exercise for both its fitness and therapeutic benefits. He advises that, “Rigorous exercise such as running and swimming can have a calming effect on children with autism.”

Prior to starting any consistent exercise regimen with your child, whether its individual or a team sport, its important to meet with your family doctor and/or pediatric physical or occupational therapist to have your child evaluated to find out which sports or physical activity would be the best fit for your child’s personality and physical abilities.

For some kids with sensory issues, communication challenges, or difficulties with social skills, team sports can be challenging. Autistic children, even those who are considered low functioning, can excel at sports like swimming, martial arts, golf, bowling, tennis, running, skiing and surfing – sports that don’t entail having to read social cues or figure out for example, when to pass the ball.

Social Skill Builder recommends using visual aids when teaching your child about sports

Our Social Skill Builder software offers visual examples that can help children with ASD navigate through interactions they can encounter on the playing field. The scenarios depicted in the Social Skill Builder videos can help children with emotional or behavioral challenges understand the dynamics of playing sports as a team.

 

Social Skill Builder can assist in teaching non-verbal cues

Choosing the right option for your child may depend on your child’s ability and desire to interact with others. Children with autism are usually unable to imitate others; merely telling them to follow what the other children are doing on the team is not enough. Providing physical and visual help as you proceed with the game is the best path to success.

For example, autistic children are very visual, and the use of visual aids when teaching your autistic child about a sport may help them begin to understand the non-verbal cues which can be critical to any sport that is played on a team. As autistic children have difficulties understanding body language, you can teach them for example, how to tell whether a teammate is about to pass them the ball, when they look at a teammate they understand what the teammate is expecting. The Social Skill Builder software, especially the My School Day CD, can help towards this goal as it addresses playground games, team dynamics, and the basics of good sportsmanship.

Sports help the rate of social inclusion for children with autism and special needs and can help children experience a taste of what it feels like to be a part of a team instead of win and the personal satisfaction that goes with it.

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