Teaching Social Interaction Skills to Teen Girls with ASD


For most children, navigating the teen years and the complex and sometimes frustrating social situations of daily life can be particularly difficult. For teens with with ASD, it can be particularly stressful.

The teenage years are a time when being social is the “number 1″ priority for kids, particularly for girls. But for kids who have acute social challenges, these years can often be the most difficult, confusing time in their lives.

Teenage girls often have very complex relationships with each other, often competitive and contentious as well as fiercely loyal and supportive. Since most children with ASD don’t pick up on social cues or understand social rules, it’s important to find a way to teach these things in a way in which they can understand.

ASD children don’t have the same intuition as other children and they can find themselves in situations they don’t understand without knowing how to react. Having the awareness of these complicated interactions with their peers and how to handle them when they occur is an important milestone in your little girl’s transition into the teen years.

A very effective way to begin to teach your child is with short videos and movies. These present the correct and sometimes the wrong way to act in a particular situation. Kids tend to enjoy watching videos, and since children with autism are often visual learners, it is really helpful in showing your child how to react properly in any situation.

School Rules! allows parents and teachers to tailor video sequences to match each child’s individual skill level

Our Social Skill Builder video modeling software, School Rules!, presents children of cognitive age 8-18 real-life video scenarios covering those parts of school life that are not part of academic programming. The videos illustrate various social situations your teenage girl might encounter, ranging from understanding the importance of friendship, to staying calm when angry, dealing with bullying, popularity, phone etiquette, and even how to deal with last minute class schedule changes.

Armed with these tools, you can help your child find her way in what is often a very confusing time for all girls, and in a way that will offer comfort and guidance for years to come.

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